The Things Hardest to Find Are Often Worth the Most

the-losers-review

First off: I would like to thank fellow Screwhead, Derek, and non-Screwhead, Beethoven, for acting as the supporting cast in my last post.  Additionally, I would like to mention that I am very cautious in recommending movies or even sharing my opinions about the movies I like; especially to Derek because he knows how to decimate my forgiving nature towards film.

Nevertheless…

Amidst discussions concerning equality and other thoughts in regards to human nature I found myself particularly having difficulty in recognizing a good example of a strong female character.  But that’s not really the forefront of this post.

The Losers came out in 2010 (read “twenty-ten”) while comic-book movies were becoming a big thing and still creating their identities.  From what I’ve witnessed, The Losers just comes off as a blip under all the other movies and millions upon millions of dollars the “successful” comic-book movies have brought in.  The Losers is, and are, overshadowed.

Basically: this team is a really good military squad.  Nothing too Super about them.  They’re just really good at what they do and at being a team.  They have a leader, the leader’s right-hand guy who is just as good and maybe better because he’s a bit more uninhibited, there’s the driver, the tech guy, and the strong-silent type.  All general typecasts and nothing too new or bold as far as statements being made.  There is a girl who helps progress the plot and move the story forward who is equally equipped to take a punch in the face and then some.  Add in a villain who has the resonance of a God among men and there’s plenty with which to create a story for a full-length feature film.  But you can’t just throw everything onto a lot of pictures that spin really fast. Things have to be interesting.  The audience has to be invested.  People have to want to stay in their seats.

More noticeably in depth I focus on the story and construction.  A lot of things I let slide because I know people don’t put as much effort into their actions as they say they do.  But then I decided to watch The Losers (again) and now, more than any previous viewing, I know I am absolutely right in saying it is nothing but good.  The way it starts, the way it progresses, the way it ends and everything involved in all other aspects of the process are everything I want and covers everything I’ve learned.

This movie is not just a good comic-book movie: it’s a good everything.  Anything any fundamentally-sound person — and everyone else — could ask for is present.  The director, Sylvain White, may not be the best but he knows the proper techniques and how to cover them well.  Not only was it the director but everyone else involved is included in my praise.  I found nothing that I would do differently.  No film (that was used in the final cut) was wasted.  Better: no screen-time was used without significance.  There was a reason for every second of the movie.  The characters were introduced and drawn out over the film.  The initial aesthetics of each character gives insight to who they are and how they might act, and react, and the progression of the movie gives them situation with which to show how they would react in order for the audience to know more about them.

But what surprised me the most was the dialogue.  Perfection.  And I don’t use that word very often. Rarely, actually; very rarely.  I usually find something that someone says that I don’t quite believe. They could have said it differently: a different word, or a phrase that doesn’t fit.  It was all believable.  I ate it all up.

I have a soft-spot for movies.  There are very few I actively say “no” to.  And before watching The Losers again I was expecting to have the same excitement in the same places.  But after events in my life unfolded and stuff kept happening and things were learned: this movie has been one of the best things I, personally — me –, has found and will forever hold on to.

Go Petunias!

The Losers, 2010
Directed by Sylvain White
Approximate run-time: One hour and 37 minutes

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *